The First FFL Minecraft Games

The second movie in the Hunger Games trilogy, Catching Fire, was released on in theaters on November 22nd, 2013. In anticipation of this exciting event, the FFL had a few Hunger Games programs. Namely, we did a screening of the first movie in our community room and we ran a specially themed Minecraft program. I have written previously about our experience with Minecraft, but this was completely different. I got the idea for this program listening to the boys in my First LEGO League team (more on that some other time) talking about playing Minecraft on various public servers.

These boys were talking specifically about a bukkit server that was set up like the Hunger Games. I did some research and found youtube videos, blogs, and instructions on using mods with Minecraft servers. With Pete’s help (our Director of Technology Integration and all around technology genius), a lot of cursing, hair pulling, and you tube watching, we were able to set up a bukkit server running the World Edit, Survival Games, and Essentials plugins. I learned a lot about commands, permissions, and general Minecraftery.

It took Pete and I probably 20 hours total to set up the server and I am quite proud of what we made, considering it was our first experience designing a Minecraft server. I really wish I had thought to take screen captures of the server when I was done… Oh well. There was a cornucopia of sorts, basically a collection of chests, around a central beacon around which everyone spawned. For the first 20 seconds of the game, nobody could attack other players, but after that there were no rules. When the field was down to only 3 players, lightning would periodically flash to show where the survivors were. At elimination, the player would return to the lobby to await the next round.

We planned the program for 30 players in 2 hours because we had 10 laptop computers we could set up and we were sure that 30 players could play at least one round each within a 2 hour period. The community room was set up something like this:

The ten players would sit at the laptops set up on tables in a kind of square and those waiting for their turn would sit in the seats surrounding them. Each wave of the game would have 3 rounds of 10 players each so that everyone would get to play at least once before anyone got a second chance. Pete set up a spreadsheet where we recorded every player’s name and kept score by who were the last players standing. One point for being third to last, 2 points for being second to last, and 3 points for the winner. Scores were really only being kept for bragging rights, since there were no prizes to be won. The rules were easy: 10 players at a time would fight until eliminated, there was to be no name-calling or foul language, everyone would get to play once per wave and we would play as many waves as we had time for, and they were to have fun doing it.

First FFL Minecraft GamesOn November 21st, 2013 at 6pm, the First FFL Minecraft Games began. We had 29 teens and children (one had to be asked to spectate only for violating the foul language rule) and several parent and friend spectators. On the projection screen we kept the list of names and scores. It took about 10 minutes to explain the rules of the game and how the server was set up and then we played one practice wave so everyone could become familiar with the arena-style gameplay. By 8pm, each player had participated in 4 games which means that we ran a total of 12 individual rounds not including the practice. Players formed alliances with others while waiting their turn to enter the arena and negotiated strategies. They even tried to persuade me to allow 2 winners per game, like in the Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games. I attempted to announce the goings on a’la Caesar Flickerman, but the action happened so fast I was having trouble keeping up, also I lost my voice after the first hour. I set my laptop up at one end of the playing area so I could spectate (and moderate) within the game as well as watch the players at the tables. After the first wave, most of the waiting players were hovering behind the current players to watch the games and call out advice and warnings. I had about 5 kids watching over my shoulder once they realized that I was spectating.

At 8:05pm, the First FFL Minecraft Games were over and all of the players returned, alive, to their parents. Many of them left having formed new friendships and with promises to meet in the Teen Computer Lab at a later date to play MinecraftEdu together. Every single one of them asked me, either that night or the next time they saw me in the library, when the next Games would be. I can tell you that as a first-time Minecraft arena game creator and as a novice player, I was personally proud of having made my first try such a success. I can also tell you that as a teen librarian, the First FFL Minecraft Games was one of the most rewarding experiences I have had. By 8:10pm, I had already begun planning the Second FFL Minecraft Games.

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