Minecraft in the Library

Minecraft at the FFLLast summer began my (and my library’s) odyssey into Minecraft. As my desk is in the teen space and my primary responsibility is to serve teens, I had been overhearing a lot of chatter about Minecraft. So, I determined that this was something the library should look into since it was not only entertaining, but educational (so much STEM I could talk your head off). The biggest problem I saw was that you needed to purchase an account in order to play it with others. But hey, you can play the free demo on their webpage and we have a bunch of laptops so… let’s play it in the library! Every Friday of our summer reading program in 2013, I pulled out the library’s laptop computers and all of our iPads for drop-in play. If there ever was a crash course in Minecraft and network infrastructures, this was it. Things I learned:

  • Gold is called butter or budder. It is important to understand the proper terminology.
  • Monsters only come out at night.
  • Teens love to show you what they made and how.
  • TNT is “da bomb.”
  • You can download the full version of Minecraft on your computer and play it offline without having a Mojang account – BUT you can’t play multiplayer without one. 
  • There is actually a maximum number of devices that can be simultaneously connected to the library’s network.
  • Nobody likes it when they can’t access the internet.

At the end of the summer our library had discovered that we had opened a veritable Pandora’s box. Teens and children had developed a taste for Minecraft and they wanted more and they wanted it now and they wanted it (most amazingly) at the library. The rest of our patrons wanted what they always want: the internet on their preferred computers or devices at the library. In order to provide access to Minecraft and to prevent overtaxing of our network, we came up with some solutions. Firstly, we invested in an organizational license for MinecraftEdu and several Mojang accounts for library use. Secondly, we increased the number of individual licenses our network was able to manage. And lastly, we installed the MinecraftEdu launcher on the computers in the library’s teen space enabling access to Minecraft without taking up any extra licenses.

sxC6sSo what’s MinecraftEdu?

MinecraftEdu is a modified edition of Minecraft that is primarily designed for schools and educational institutions to use as a teaching tool. I’m not even going to go into all the things educators are using Minecraft to teach, you can read about that at the MinecraftEdu website. We chose to implement MinecraftEdu so that we could provide access to Minecraft without inadvertently providing access to content that is in violation of our own patron code of conduct. With MinecraftEdu, our patrons can play multiplayer in our library-hosted server with other players in the library. Our server can only be accessed from within our library, which means that we can be sure no outside player can troll our server. That also means that we are able to moderate our server easily; the players must be within the walls of our library to enter, so if there is a case of griefing the culprit can be easily identified and asked to modify their behavior to abide by our patron code of conduct.

Long story short… it’s Minecraft and it’s in the library.

What’s about network licenses?

Our library has one adult computer lab, one teen computer lab, two computer areas in the children’s room, and additional desktop computers in various places throughout the library. These computers each need a license to connect to the internet through our server. Additionally, every cell phone, tablet, laptop, etc. that is brought into the library and accesses the internet through our free wifi network uses a license. Before last summer we had never (to my knowledge) had a case where there were more computers and devices accessing the internet through the library network than we had licenses for. I admit that I am not entirely sure what it means, but I do understand that there is a max number of things that can connect to the internet through our network and we went over. When we had 16 laptops and 4 ipads using the library’s wifi in addition to the existing computers during the summer at peak times (more people with more mobile devices), we had so many connectivity errors in the Minecraft program and out in the library which caused so many complaints and frustrations, that every Friday afternoon just before these programs we would go through and clear out the cache of connected devices just so we could attempt to get the laptops online.

Should you contemplate incorporating Minecraft into your library offerings, I recommend that you have a discussion with your IT person(s) about what this might mean and anticipate the problems so that you can solve them easily. We have since increased the number of active licenses our network can carry (which was especially important since we wanted to use the laptops for programs more often).

Playing TogetherI really love that we have been able to provide Minecraft to the teens and children in our library. Not just because I love overhearing them talk about chickens in the bathtub and zombie pigmen attacks, but because of the STEAM literacies they are building through play and they ways in which they use their fandom to other areas of their lives. In the course of 5 months, teens in our library have built 7 civilizations that I am aware of each with a government system, a currency, a real estate ownership method, and a justice system. They have formed alliances, participated in government coups, fought together, and made peace. They have made truly creative structures which are controlled through a specially designed series of redstone circuits and switches. I am awed by what they have and are creating and I can’t wait to see what they decide to do next.

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margaretportier

I am a teen librarian. I am a learner of things and a doer of doings.

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